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1945 Letter to FJA 
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PITA Bred
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
BillPatterson wrote:
and "Fanne," should the term come up, is short for "femmefan," a fan who is a woman.

"We had a good meeting last year, a girl came..." - Trekkies

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"Hier stehe ich. Ich kann nicht anders." - Luther
In the end, I found Heinlein is finite. Thus, finite analysis is needed.


Mon Jun 07, 2010 8:32 pm
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
I have learned that Letters of Note also recently featured correspondence between the 14-year-old Forrest J. Ackerman and Edgar Rice Burroughs:
http://www.lettersofnote.com/2010/04/all-you-speak-of-is-real-to-me.html

Ackerman, August 25, 1931:
(On arguing with his teacher about the merits of ERB's works)
Quote:
Then came the last straw when she said: "Now if he'd write like Verne his stories would be more acceptable. Verne had something. He could write of a submarine, something that didn't exist in his time. He had imagination. Burroughs doesn't." Now I ask you: is Verne's sub. any better example of imagination than your machine that went to the center of the earth? Not as far as I can see!

Another thing: she said she'd be in jungles many times and your conception of them was "all wet", so to speak. She says you don't know what you're talking about. Claims there are no such jungles of trees as Tarzan goes thru and a lot of other nonsence. Who cares about that? All you speak of is real to me. Hawthorne, Cooper and others may have written "Classics", but I'll take one of your fast-moving novels any day to those dead old things that ought to have been buried years ago.
Burroughs, August 27, 1931:
Quote:
Tell your teacher that, though she may be right about my stories, there are some fifty million people in the world who will not agree with her, which is fortunate for me, since even writers of garbage-can literature must eat.

My stories will do you no harm. If they have helped to inculcate in you a love of books, they have done you much good. No fiction is worth reading except for entertainment. If it entertains and is clean, it is good literature, or its kind. If it forms the habit of reading, in people who might not read otherwise, it is the best literature.


Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:56 am
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Heinlein Nexus

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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
Forry always was a 14-year old inside. I've read quite a few of his letters; the tone and language remained the same throughout his life.

And when I was 13 and 14, Famous Monsters of Filmland was a major addiction, because I had found a boon companion.

A few years later, it was unbelievable dull.

Apparently, I adolesced....

But the enthusiasm of the man remained infectious in his eighties when he helped me wholeheartedly in my research into Leslyn.


Thu Jul 08, 2010 7:19 am
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
I've known a number of "adults" who managed to keep that 14-year old enthusiasm for *something* alive well into adulthood.

Many of them were geeks.

_All_ of them were happy.


Thu Jul 08, 2010 7:23 am
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PITA Bred
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
Some famous literati was asked, at around age 70, if he had had a happy childhood. "I am still having a happy childhood," he replied.

Enthusiasm need not be childish nor something muted or set aside with "adulthood." It need not even be justified to any second party. However, RJ has a valid point that some enthusiasms appeal only to a less-mature mind. While a continuing fascination with, say, Legos into adulthood would strike most of us as childish, it's not ours to judge. However, most adults find the limitations of the Legoverse pretty stultifying and need no justification of a wish to move on.

One of my more interesting (to analyze) enthusiasms was my choice of humor magazine. I loved MAD Magazine from the time I was able to read (or a bit before) well into my teens. Then it seemed tired and childish and I moved on to National Lampoon. It took me only a few years to realize that NatLamp's "sophistication" was an incredibly gauche, immature sophomorism appealing only to that sliver of, well, college sophomores in the classic sense. I tired of it and a few years later rediscovered MAD, which for its superficial teener gloss had vast reserves of truly witty and intelligent humor lurking beneath. I read it for another two decades (until, to my mortification, I realized I had to find my reading glasses to read my new issue).

And then *sigh* it devolved into a crass, shallow copy of its worst aspects and became a low-rent, imitation NatLamp. In a correspondence with John Ficarra, I outlined the problem as not moving forward with a more sophisticated generation of readers, not crossing the line into stronger vulgarity (both of which were true and arguably necessary) but changing from a very inclusive, in-group sense of humor to the kind of nasty, exclusive, laughing-at-you "humor" that characterized NatLamp and eventually killed it. I've picked up the occasional issue since and it's only gotten worse.

And funny, it's not me that's changed; MAD was surprisingly consistent from inception through maybe the early Oughts and like a fine single-malt, either appealed or did not. I don't know who it appeals to now but it's no one I know of who is/was a longtime reader.

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"Hier stehe ich. Ich kann nicht anders." - Luther
In the end, I found Heinlein is finite. Thus, finite analysis is needed.


Thu Jul 08, 2010 10:22 am
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
You didn't mention Spy magazine. I enjoyed that for its full, all-to-brief run.


Thu Jul 08, 2010 3:02 pm
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Heinlein Nexus

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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
I still have a child living within me, who loves comics and building models and watching old movie serials and so forth....

But unlike Forry, I like Literachoor too.....

I contain multitudes....


Fri Jul 09, 2010 5:03 am
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Heinlein Biographer

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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
RobertJames wrote:
I still have a child living within me, who loves comics and building models and watching old movie serials and so forth....

But unlike Forry, I like Literachoor too.....

I contain multitudes....

ahem *koff* low-flying straight lline! Pull!


Fri Jul 09, 2010 5:41 am
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
The discussion here included a digression about the "Boat Cloak" recommended by Heinlein in an interview. Someone requested a picture. I googled the topic and found a picture among other Marine Corps Dress Uniforms. I have a copy saved if you have any use for it, can send as an e-mail attachment, if you want it.


Sun Apr 24, 2011 5:34 pm
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Post Re: 1945 Letter to FJA
It is included in the following thread:

http://forums.military.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/8130030511001/m/8810033102001


Sun Apr 24, 2011 6:12 pm
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