http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/

The Heinlein Centennial
http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=7
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Author:  sakeneko [ Fri May 22, 2009 9:06 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

Another moderately serious Holmesian? D*mn, we do like a lot of the same books, Jim. ;-)

Author:  PeterScott [ Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:53 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

As a placemarker for future visitors to this "sticky" topic - there is an entire forum ("Heinlein Centennial Retrospectives") dedicated to the Centennial, and currently an active thread within it telling the story of the Centennial's birth. That forum is in general a better place than this topic for posting centennial-related stuff.

Author:  JimCng [ Wed Jul 08, 2009 8:47 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

.....Yes, the house he was born in (that of his grandfather Dr. Alva Lyle) is still there. I was fortunate in that we got to take a fast side trip to Butler before dashing back to KC to catch our flight home, and took some pictures of the house, the Butler library, etc.

In response to this old post of Jim's, I was there several weeks ago for the annual board meeting of the Heinlein Foundation and drove by the house. It looks very nice under its recent ownership, well maintained and better looking than it has been in several years -- but the sign identifying it as Robert's childhood home is no longer there.
All the best,
Jim Cunningham

Author:  PeterScott [ Sat Aug 15, 2009 6:01 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

Two of our space track speakers - Michael Laine and Jordin Kare - feature in this CNN article about cutting-edge space technology. The main focus is tethers but there's stuff about beamed power and the Space Elevator Games.

Interestingly enough, prize money for the games comes from NASA's Centennial Challenges program. (In this case, the centennial is of the Wright Brothers.)

Laine has sacrificed everything for his dream. Heinlein would have been so proud.

Author:  PeterScott [ Sun Sep 13, 2009 9:46 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

I just discovered this delightful quotation from Groucho Marx, which I post here even though it may antagonize our members from our also-delightful convention city: :D
Quote:
It isn't necessary to have relatives in Kansas City in order to be unhappy.

Author:  sakeneko [ Mon Sep 14, 2009 5:43 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

PeterScott wrote:
I just discovered this delightful quotation from Groucho Marx, which I post here even though it may antagonize our members from our also-delightful convention city: :D
Quote:
It isn't necessary to have relatives in Kansas City in order to be unhappy.


For "Kansas City", substitute any city, town, suburb, village, hamlet, or heremitic retreat of your choice and this statement is still true. The converse is also true. (But trust Groucho Marx to grumble instead of rejoice; it was his style.) ;)

Author:  georule [ Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:14 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

Btw, is there anything I can do to help re the DVDs of the sessions? Is there anyway to move that to "distributed-processing-by-the-faithful-and-reliable" that makes sense? I can't believe I'd be the only one outside the original committee that would hope they are proven commodities in the faithful-and-reliable catagory that would volunteer to help. . . .even if that meant acquiring specififed hardware/software to do so. After all, I am married to a TV engineer and USC Cinema grad (Emmy award-winning, even). . .and who might even be able to cadge some free hours of the hardware/software resources of a top-20 market network-affiliated TV station.

Author:  JamesGifford [ Fri Feb 05, 2010 8:03 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

The processing is only one facet of the... issues. In very short, the content is an asset with certain value, and conserving that value is a worthwhile goal.

Everyone wants the content but is... unwilling to build any goalposts.

Author:  georule [ Fri Feb 05, 2010 6:22 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

Parts of that I get, parts are. . . a little too indirect for me. If the gist is, getting the processing done isn't the main issue, then fine.

Whatever, I trust y'all. . . just know the offer is out there if there's anything I can do. Someway somehow someday a way forward needs to happen.

One could always get the processing done, and charge a very high price for the product. . . it is easier to lower a price than raise it, should that seem advisable later. "Early adopters" are used to being soaked for the privilege of having stuff significantly in advance of everyone else. . .as long as at least reasonable time lapse is granted them before hoi polloi get the discount rate. Lower the price significantly in three month increments and there will be justifiable howls from those who paid the premium --do it in two year increments, and probably not so much. Such a scheme should also trump any theoretical arguements over "what the market will bear" with actual data on that point. Very Heinleinian, that. Jes' saying.

One could also imagine chopping that content up into bundles to make it still pretty profitable per-hour (vs media production/reproduction costs --yes, I remember our conversations in KC; clearly part of the 'cost' of the DVDs is the sunk costs you Heinlein Heroes bore to hold such a spectacular event in the first place), but still reasonable-ish for the budget minded --"best of", content-area specific, etc type bundles, for instance. Such a multi-pronged strategy might reasonably straddle both populist and economic considerations. Got a ballpark on total hours of video in the can?

Anyway, some ramblings unasked for, and worth what you paid for them --I 'm still stumbling a bit in the dark on exactly what you're pointing at re the internal conversation.

P.S. --re the Luther in your sig -- have you ever read the back and forth between Martin Luther, father of the Reformation, and Sir Thomas More, Catholic Saint? What a hoot! 16th century flame-war par excellance. I'll never be able to trash-talk (on both sides) that well. . .nor wish to. There is the "effluence of the hind-end of she-asses", etc. Sort of reminds me of the line in Raiders of the Lost Ark about burying a plain pocket watch for 1,000 years and it becomes a priceless relic.

Author:  RobertJames [ Mon May 17, 2010 10:01 am ]
Post subject:  Re: The Heinlein Centennial

Geo, one of the reasons I love you so much is your bizarre and wonderful reading habits.

I read a bio of Martin Luther last semester, and first learned of these debates. I am already working my way through the Churchill history of WWII, solely because you read them yearly.....and now, I shall have to read these....

I may never read Heinlein again....

Then again....

:)

Robert

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