http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/

Heinlein action scenes
http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=580
Page 2 of 3

Author:  JamesGifford [ Fri Jan 01, 2010 1:20 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

NickDoten wrote:
it may take a couple of army vets to appreciate a good sword fight ! ;)

*scratches head* From what army? :D

Author:  scottwilliamson [ Fri Jan 01, 2010 5:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

TEFL. Lazarus and his wife (forgive me, it's been a few years, I forget her name; Dora, short for adorable?) on their remote homestead. An all male family of four show up and finally make their play. Lazarus and Dora reverse the situation and get the drop on them. This scene is the first that came to mind. It's not as physically active as most of the above, but emotionally, it was extremely satisfying. Even when I know how it turns out, I go from, "Uh-oh, they're screwed," to delicious frontier justice. We've seen it before in many westerns. I love that RAH could render it so well in words.

Author:  NickDoten [ Sun Jan 03, 2010 7:55 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

which one would you like? a vet respects his opponents capabilities ;)

Author:  DanHenderson [ Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:55 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

NickDoten wrote:
it may take a couple of army vets to appreciate a good sword fight ! ;)


Not necessarily. I didn't do military service (too tall to fly, and if I couldn't be a pilot, there wasn't anything else I wanted to do), but I joined the fencing team at Rice University because I enjoyed Glory Road so much. I would love to see that fight on the screen!

Author:  RobertWFranson [ Tue Jan 26, 2010 10:43 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

PeterScott wrote:
visually dramatic action scenes.
Great scenes mentioned in the thread, although I think Heinlein has plenty of visual drama if action is not too narrowly defined.

Oddly, what first came to my mind is a scene that could be quite visually dramatic, if filmed imaginatively -- it is high-speed, even though it has virtually no human action: Hazel and Buster's breathtaking out-of-control flight in The Rolling Stones.

In the next one that pops up, the action is swimming, as crewfolk desperately try to reach the starship in Time for the Stars.

These may not be as busy of motion as Waldo tap-dancing, but they sure are powerful. Lots more like them.

Author:  JamesGifford [ Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:14 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

RobertWFranson wrote:
...I think Heinlein has plenty of visual drama if action is not too narrowly defined.

You also have to put it in context. I am once again trying to complete the first rereading of the Foundation trilogy since high school. Again, I am both attracted by the power and sweep of the story... and terminally put off by the fact that Asimov chose to tell it as endless dialogue of people describing what's happened/happening/going to happen. The most dramatic action in the whole three books is when someone walks angrily across the floor to deliver a thunderous line of dialogue. (End of chapter; open next chap with quotes...)

I'll take Heinlein's version of "action" any day.

Author:  PeterScott [ Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:31 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

JamesGifford wrote:
I am once again trying to complete the first rereading of the Foundation trilogy since high school. [...] The most dramatic action in the whole three books is when someone walks angrily across the floor to deliver a thunderous line of dialogue.


Oh pshaw. What about the Mule's attack on Terminus? What about the three-way psychic battle between the Mule, Han Pritcher, and Bail Channis? Bayta Darrell shooting Ebling Mis moments before his revelation?

Action is not constrained to fist meeting jaw.

Author:  RobertWFranson [ Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:36 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

JamesGifford wrote:
terminally put off
A few years ago I wrote up my impression that "The Mule" section (comprising about a fifth of The Foundation Trilogy) is its high point, rather than the trilogy's terminus many pages later. I think of "The Mule" (1945) as the hinge in Asimov's style in the Foundation stories: between the geopolitical chronicles of the earlier stories, and the romantic mystery of the latter ones.

Author:  holmesiv [ Mon Apr 11, 2011 5:00 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

NickDoten wrote:
For me it's the sword dual Oscar has with with Cyrano in the tower (Glory Road)


OK, but what about Oscar's "swinging" attack on the monsters in the forest?

Author:  BillPatterson [ Mon Apr 11, 2011 5:30 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Heinlein action scenes

Not quite on this point but maybe interesting enough . . .

I noticed recently how often Heinlein has his action sequences in the middle and then the ends become talking heads. The observation came up with regard to Have Space Suit, but darned if Citizen of the Galaxy isn't exactly the same.

Typically the action grows throughout and climaxes near the end. Heinlein's books are not typical.

Page 2 of 3 All times are UTC - 8 hours
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/