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Lysistrata Goes To Town
http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=645
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Author:  DavidWrightSr [ Sun Mar 14, 2010 6:57 am ]
Post subject:  Lysistrata Goes To Town

I was brushing up on my German by reading The Past Through Tomorrow (the translation has the title Methusaleh's Kindern)

While reading "Delilah and the Space Rigger", (Delila und der Raummonteur), I noticed a reference that I had never thought about. When Gloria comes to the theater, Tiny walks out. The narrator mentions that it was a good film "Lysistrata Goes To Town".

The original Lysistrata, of course, was a play by Aristophanes.
http://www.theatredatabase.com/ancient/aristophanes_005.html

Once I read the summary, it became obvious to me that Heinlein was emphasizing the changes that having an 'untouchable woman' in the presence of a group of men would cause.

What do you think?

After 50 years of multiple readings of all that Heinlein wrote, I am amazed that I still can notice things that I have never noticed before.

Author:  BillPatterson [ Sun Mar 14, 2010 7:43 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

DavidWrightSr wrote:
I was brushing up on my German by reading The Past Through Tomorrow (the translation has the title Methusaleh's Kindern)

While reading "Delilah and the Space Rigger", (Delila und der Raummonteur), I noticed a reference that I had never thought about. When Gloria comes to the theater, Tiny walks out. The narrator mentions that it was a good film "Lysistrata Goes To Town".

The original Lysistrata, of course, was a play by Aristophanes.
http://www.theatredatabase.com/ancient/aristophanes_005.html

Once I read the summary, it became obvious to me that Heinlein was emphasizing the changes that having an 'untouchable woman' in the presence of a group of men would cause.

What do you think?

After 50 years of multiple readings of all that Heinlein wrote, I am amazed that I still can notice things that I have never noticed before.

Let's have another update in another 50, hmmm?

A couple of points occur to me. First, that sounds like a parody of a contemporary film title -- or contemporary of the 1930's and early 1940's, at any rate -- which reminds me that "Delilah and the Space Rigger" is a gentle satire with a two-edged bite. First it lampoons the retrogressive attitudes of the construction gang, but by bringing Lysistrata into it it also says "you women have to be the ones leading the way in this," going to town (i.e., getting out of the house) by figuratively withholding sex or abandoning sex-based privileges. This is not a strong message; the Lysistrata reference occurs only once, but it's present, so I take it Heinlein's intent was to make it present without belaboring his audience.

Delilah was published in Blue Book, IIRC, which was one of the slicks widely read by both male and female readers, like SEP.

Author:  DavidWrightSr [ Sun Mar 14, 2010 9:06 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

I don't know exactly why, but 'going to town' has, for me, a connotation of 'making a splash'. That would certainly describe what Gloria did :?

Author:  RobertWFranson [ Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:01 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

Good spotting. I don't think I've reread "Delilah and the Space Rigger" since reading Lysistrata -- but I might have missed that anyway. Thanks!

Author:  holmesiv [ Fri Apr 15, 2011 7:12 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

Funny, I noticed it on first reading, and I've never read "Lysistrata."

Author:  Daled73 [ Sun Apr 24, 2011 1:40 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

For those not experienced with The Lysistrata, unless you read Greek, beware of getting a "pansy" translation into English. There are a LOT of those around.

It is also necessary to realize that this piece of anti-war propaganda was performed for the first time in the middle of the Pelloponesian War, which in the end left Athens prostrate at the feet of Sparta. Yet Athenians were free enough to both write, produce and attend sucha play in the middle of a life-or-death struggle for national survival.

The plot is approximately (and much oversimplified) this: The women of both Athens and Sparta are tired of thier men being gone to war all the time and go on STRIKE (shades of John Galt!). Nobody gets a piece, until they make peace!

Toward the end of the play the actors are all wearing "appliances" to make it appear they ALL have raging hard-ons under their clothes, and much ribald humor hangs thereby.

Author:  PeterScott [ Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:18 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

This reminded me of one of my favorite satires: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15851/15 ... htm#toc_27 .

Author:  deserto [ Thu May 16, 2013 6:13 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Lysistrata Goes To Town

holmesiv wrote:
Funny, I noticed it on first reading, and I've never read "Lysistrata."

ya same here, but i just did some little research and i think it is interesting so i'll try to read it

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