http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/

Methauris
http://www.heinleinsociety.org/thsnexus/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=618
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Author:  georule [ Wed Feb 03, 2010 5:50 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

Oh, and here's an authorization to travel to NYC to "for the purpose of examing high-speed motion picture camera developed by Bell Telephone Laboratories."

Ahh, and here's his weighted by responsibility job description at one point. Plastics, plastics, plastics. . .too long for me to type out right now tho.

Somebody remind me where the anti-kamakaze thing came from? Or do I have the wrong favorite author there? Looking at some docs with Robert apparently helping John Campbell make research proposals to Philly re fire-retardation on aircraft carriers. . . (Edit: Ahh, but that last is 1942, so unlikely to be anything to do with kamikazes).

Author:  beamjockey [ Thu Feb 04, 2010 7:33 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

georule wrote:
Oh, and to how the more fantastic kind of rumors got started, well, here's a recruiting pitch to someone named "George" and engineering friends. . .

"I wish I could tell you something about the work, but naturally almost all of it is confidential. But I can assure you that much of it is a good bit more fantastic than any thing I dared to put into stories."

There are expense reports in that file for a June 1943 recruiting trip to the University of Pittsburgh, seeking young engineers.

This ties in to a November 1969 letter to Burlingame, partially quoted in Grumbles, where Heinlein writes of a trip to NASA in Houston, and seeing

Ted Hayes [sic], whom I [had] hired as an undergraduate at U of Pittsburgh twenty-seven years ago to work at the Naval Aircraft Factory-- and I lured him into signing with me rather than General Electric by promising him that he could help develop pressure suits for fighter pilots and I kept my promise and it led directly to him developing the first suit used on the Moon.

Ted Hays's own resume doesn't mention pressure suit work during the war, but soon enough he was working on the problem; he was drafted in 1945, the Army put him to work at Wright Field, and upon discharged he returned to the Naval Air Material Center and spent the next couple of decades working on pressure suits, space suits, and life-support systems, first for the Navy, later for NASA.

Author:  BillMullins [ Thu Feb 04, 2010 3:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

Somewhere around here I've got a report by RAH from that era which is not listed in Gifford. I've written about it to several members of this forum.

It is mostly a "data report" -- Heinlein subjected samples of numerous plastics to impact tests, and reported the results. The most interesting thing about it is that de Camp was in the management chain that had to sign off on its publication.

Author:  georule [ Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:10 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

beamjockey wrote:
georule wrote:
Oh, and to how the more fantastic kind of rumors got started, well, here's a recruiting pitch to someone named "George" and engineering friends. . .

"I wish I could tell you something about the work, but naturally almost all of it is confidential. But I can assure you that much of it is a good bit more fantastic than any thing I dared to put into stories."

There are expense reports in that file for a June 1943 recruiting trip to the University of Pittsburgh, seeking young engineers.

This ties in to a November 1969 letter to Burlingame, partially quoted in Grumbles, where Heinlein writes of a trip to NASA in Houston, and seeing

Ted Hayes [sic], whom I [had] hired as an undergraduate at U of Pittsburgh twenty-seven years ago to work at the Naval Aircraft Factory-- and I lured him into signing with me rather than General Electric by promising him that he could help develop pressure suits for fighter pilots and I kept my promise and it led directly to him developing the first suit used on the Moon.

Ted Hays's own resume doesn't mention pressure suit work during the war, but soon enough he was working on the problem; he was drafted in 1945, the Army put him to work at Wright Field, and upon discharged he returned to the Naval Air Material Center and spent the next couple of decades working on pressure suits, space suits, and life-support systems, first for the Navy, later for NASA.


Hiya, Bill, how ya doing? It was nice to talk to you in Montreal. . . .

Author:  beamjockey [ Fri Feb 05, 2010 9:40 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

georule wrote:
Hiya, Bill, how ya doing? It was nice to talk to you in Montreal. . . .


Pretty good-- my antimatter work, which was triggered by letters I found in the Heinlein Archive, has become an introduction to a Haffner Press chapbook containing Jack Williamson's story Opposites-- React! And copies came off the press last week. I had to autograph them all, which was a peculiar new experience.

Seehttp://www.haffnerpress.com/.

Photo at http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/FK ... directlink.

(I should probably announce this in a posting with its own topic.)

Author:  georule [ Fri Feb 05, 2010 7:29 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

Well, I don't run this place. . .but seems pretty reasonably relevant topic to me.

Author:  BillPatterson [ Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:31 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

georule wrote:
Oh, and to how the more fantastic kind of rumors got started, well, here's a recruiting pitch to someone named "George" and engineering friends. . .

"I wish I could tell you something about the work, but naturally almost all of it is confidential. But I can assure you that much of it is a good bit more fantastic than any thing I dared to put into stories."

Baiting the hook with plastic worms, Robert --naughty, naughty!

Probably George H. Smith, the cuckoo in John Campbell's nest.

Audrey, Jim has a copy of my biography somewhere; you can look up almost everything that's known about his WWII engineering work. From May to about November 1942 he was doing administrative and recruiting work; he went into materials engineering in 1942, but did what might be called "meta-engineering" rather than design work -- i.e., setting up and recording tests on, e.g., strength of materials. He never actually worked on the high altitude project, though he was slated to manage the project; he was not even allowed to take the medical tests (as an old lunger) for high altitude tolerance, so he passed it off to de Camp when he got back from a training class. His engineering work gets more specific when the NAES is reorganized and he is book-transferred to the Plastics and Adhesives section in 1943-1944. His own biggest project until mid-1945 was on methacrylate canopies for aircraft, which tended to crack and sometimes explode outward at low pressures. There is a section of the canpoies engineering report about day-to-day maintenance and care of these canopies. He was never able to completely solve that one, as he couldn't find the right materials. Cal Laning brought him a radome project in late 1944 that he was able to move that from design and engineering into actual production.

Author:  RobertWFranson [ Tue Nov 09, 2010 11:57 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

beamjockey wrote:
... my antimatter work, which was triggered by letters I found in the Heinlein Archive, has become an introduction to a Haffner Press chapbook containing Jack Williamson's story Opposites-- React! And copies came off the press last week. I had to autograph them all, which was a peculiar new experience.

Seehttp://www.haffnerpress.com/.

Photo at http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/FK ... directlink.

(I should probably announce this in a posting with its own topic.)
Is this chapbook available separately, or is your "antimatter work"?

And has anyone put all the seetee stories into one volume?

Author:  beamjockey [ Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:02 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

RobertWFranson wrote:
beamjockey wrote:
... my antimatter work, which was triggered by letters I found in the Heinlein Archive, has become an introduction to a Haffner Press chapbook containing Jack Williamson's story Opposites-- React! And copies came off the press last week. I had to autograph them all, which was a peculiar new experience.
Is this chapbook available separately, or is your "antimatter work"?


No, the chapbook is available only as part os a $150 boxed (and limited) edition of The Worlds of Jack Williamson. And I have not published the introduction elsewhere.
RobertWFranson wrote:
And has anyone put all the seetee stories into one volume?

No. Stephen Haffner might well be the right guy to do it. But he has plenty of work on his plate... ongoing republication of Williamson and Edmond Hamilton, plus ventures into Leigh Brackett and the Kuttners.

Author:  RobertWFranson [ Wed Nov 10, 2010 7:09 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Methauris

beamjockey wrote:
No, the chapbook is available only as part os a $150 boxed (and limited) edition of The Worlds of Jack Williamson. And I have not published the introduction elsewhere.
RobertWFranson wrote:
And has anyone put all the seetee stories into one volume?

No. Stephen Haffner might well be the right guy to do it. But he has plenty of work on his plate... ongoing republication of Williamson and Edmond Hamilton, plus ventures into Leigh Brackett and the Kuttners.
Double shucks. Thanks for the info.

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